Our work

The Centre for Dynamic Imaging is helping researchers make exciting discoveries impacting major areas of human health.

Visualising biological mechanisms and behaviours is a gateway to understanding disease.

Scientists are now capturing spectacular images and real-time video from single cells and tissue slices, right through to whole organs. These new views of biology are bringing us closer to developing better disease diagnostics and treatments.

  • Early stage lung development Image of a lung in its very early stages of development. As it grows, the lung’s ‘roots’ thin and multiply into the intricate airway structures that form an adult lung. Credit: Casey Ah-Cann
  • Microscopy image of breast tissue Magnified snapshot of a mammary gland during lactation. In yellow are muscle cells that contract and release, helping to squeeze milk into the mammary ducts. Purple flecks in and around the structures are immune cells on high alert for any threats in order to help keep the breast tissue healthy. Credit: Caleb Dawson
  • Vessels in the retina Imaging of the retinal vasculature is used to study various eye diseases and conditions. Here cells within the minor vasculature are segmented while the main vessels are excluded. Credit: Emma Watson, Leigh Coultas, Lachlan Whitehead
  • Microscopy image of mitochondrial DNA Mitochondrial DNA release during cell death, captured on the lattice light sheet. Credit: Kate McArthur, Niall Geoghegan
  • Microscopy image taken using 3D SIM SIM (structural illumination microscopy) image of SMCHD1 in the nucleus, captured using Deltavision OMX SR. Credit: Iromi Wanigasuriya
  • Imaged cancer cells Long term imaging of cancer cells. Credit: Dr Kim Pham
  • Microscopy image of red blood cell A group of red blood cells (magenta) with the central cell infected by P.falciparum, the parasite that causes the deadliest form of malaria. Credit: Dr Michał Pasternak

Selected Publications

BAK/BAX macropores facilitate mitochondrial herniation and mtDNA efflux during apoptosis.

McArthur K, Whitehead LW, Heddleston JM, Li L, Padman BS, Oorschot V, Geoghegan ND, Chappaz S, Davidson S, San Chin H, Lane RM, Dramicanin M, Saunders TL, Sugiana C, Lessene R, Osellame LD, Chew TL, Dewson G, Lazarou M, Ramm G, Lessene G, Ryan MT, Rogers KL, van Delft MF, Kile BT. Science. 2018 2018 Feb 23; 359 (883). doi: 10.1126/science.aao6047 PMID: 29472455

Endothelial cell survival during angiogenesis requires the pro-survival protein MCL1

Watson EC, Whitehead L, Adams RH, Dewson G, Coultas L. Endothelial cell survival during angiogenesis requires the pro-survival protein MCL1. Cell Death Differ. 2016 Aug;23(8):1371-9. doi: 10.1038/cdd.2016.20. Epub 2016 Mar 4. PubMed PMID: 26943318

Essential Role of the PfRh5/PfRipr/CyRPA Complex during Plasmodium falciparum Invasion of Erythrocytes

Volz JC, Yap A, Sisquella X, Thompson JK, Lim NT, Whitehead LW, Chen L, Lampe M, Tham WH, Wilson D, Nebl T, Marapana D, Triglia T, Wong W, Rogers KL, Cowman AF. Essential Role of the PfRh5/PfRipr/CyRPA Complex during Plasmodium falciparum Invasion of Erythrocytes. Cell Host Microbe. 2016 Jul 13;20(1):60-71. doi:10.1016/j.chom.2016.06.004. Epub 2016 Jun 30. PMID: 27374406

EGF-mediated induction of Mcl-1 at the switch to lactation is essential for alveolar cell survival

Fu NY, Rios AC, Pal B, Soetanto R, Lun AT, Liu K, Beck T, Best SA, Vaillant F, Bouillet P, Strasser A, Preiss T, Smyth GK, Lindeman GJ, Visvader JE. EGF-mediated induction of Mcl-1 at the switch to lactation is essential for alveolar cell survival. Nat Cell Biol. 2015 Apr;17(4):365-75. doi: 10.1038/ncb3117. Epub 2015 Mar 2. PubMed PMID: 2573047

T cell signaling. Antigen affinity, costimulation, and cytokine inputs sum linearly to amplify T cell expansion

Marchingo JM, Kan A, Sutherland RM, Duffy KR, Wellard CJ, Belz GT, Lew AM, Dowling MR, Heinzel S, Hodgkin PD. T cell signaling. Antigen affinity, costimulation, and cytokine inputs sum linearly to amplify T cell expansion. Science. 2014 Nov 28;346(6213):1123-7. doi: 10.1126/science.1260044. PMID: 25430770

In situ identification of bipotent stem cells in the mammary gland

Rios AC, Fu NY, Lindeman GJ, Visvader JE. In situ identification of bipotent stem cells in the mammary gland. Nature. 2014 Feb 20;506(7488):322-7. doi: 10.1038/nature12948. Epub 2014 Jan 26. PMID: 24463516

A lineage of diploid platelet-forming cells precedes polyploid megakaryocyte formation in the mouse embryo

Potts KS, Sargeant TJ, Markham JF, Shi W, Biben C, Josefsson EC, Whitehead LW, Rogers KL, Liakhovitskaia A, Smyth GK, Kile BT, Medvinsky A, Alexander WS, Hilton DJ, Taoudi S. A lineage of diploid platelet-forming cells precedes polyploid megakaryocyte formation in the mouse embryo. Blood. 2014 Oct 23;124(17):2725-9. doi: 10.1182/blood-2014-02-559468. Epub 2014 Jul 25. PMID: 25079356

Cell-cell communication between malaria-infected red blood cells via exosome-like vesicles

Regev-Rudzki N, Wilson DW, Carvalho TG, Sisquella X, Coleman BM, Rug M, Bursac D, Angrisano F, Gee M, Hill AF, Baum J, Cowman AF. Cell-cell communication between malaria-infected red blood cells via exosome-like vesicles. Cell. 2013 May 23;153(5):1120-33. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2013.04.029. Epub 2013 May 15. PMID: 23683579

Spatial association with PTEX complexes defines regions for effector export into Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

Riglar DT, Rogers KL, Hanssen E, Turnbull L, Bullen HE, Charnaud SC, Przyborski J, Gilson PR, Whitchurch CB, Crabb BS, Baum J, Cowman AF. Spatial association with PTEX complexes defines regions for effector export into Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Nat Commun. 2013 4:1415. doi:10.1038/ncomms2449. PubMed PMID: 23361006; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3562467

Activation-induced B cell fates are selected by intracellular stochastic competition

Duffy KR, Wellard CJ, Markham JF, Zhou JH, Holmberg R, Hawkins ED, Hasbold J, Dowling MR, Hodgkin PD. Activation-induced B cell fates are selected by intracellular stochastic competition. Science. 2012 Jan 20;335(6066):338-41. doi: 10.1126/science.1213230. Epub 2012 Jan 5. PMID: 22223740