Lattice light sheet

Lattice light sheet microscopy is the current state of the art for live cell imaging, enabling unprecedented 4D imaging capabilities.

Overview

Imaging biology in 4D has been a significant challenge in recent decades. The light used for imaging usually damages biological samples, making long term time-lapse microscopy extremely difficult.

Lattice light sheet microscopy is at the cutting edge of technology for live cell imaging because it is incredibly gentle on samples, allowing high resolution imaging over time. 

Examples of work
  • Photo of the lattice light sheet microscope
    The Institute's lattice light sheet microscope in the Centre for Dynamic Imaging
  • Microscopy image of blood cells
    Immune cell panel: nucleus (red), mitochondria (green) and lysosomes (cyan). Credit: William Chang, Niall Geoghegan
  • Photo of the lattice light sheet microscope
    Detailed view of the lattice light sheet microscope
  • Photo of the lattice light sheet microscope
    Detail of the lattice light sheet microscope
  • Photo of the lattice light sheet microscope
    Detail of the lattice light sheet microscope

Hardware

Objectives

Excitation objective

  • Special optics 28.6x Magnification, 0.7 NA

Detection Objective

  • Nikon Apo LWD Water dipping objective: 25x, 1.1 NA

Imaging characteristics

  • 62x Magnification 
  • XY Resolution – 230 nm
  • Z resolution – 370 nm
  • Light sheet length – 10 µm – 100 µm

Light sources

  • MPB fiber lasers – 488 nm, 561 nm, 589 nm and 642 nm

Detection source

  • 2 x Hamamatsu Orca Flash 4 - V2  
  • 2048 x 2048 Pixels 
  • 6.5 µm x 6.5 µm pixel size 
  • 16 - bit 
  • 100 fps (At full frame) 
  • 82% QE (Peak at 560 nm) 

Technological specifications (capabilities)

Available modalities

  • Z-stack
  • Time Series
  • Multi-positions

Unique features

Lattice light sheet microscopy allows high resolution 4D imaging over many hours.

Limitations

  • Complex sample geometry leads to unconventional sample mounting
  • No transmitted light options
  • No eye pieces 
  • Large quantities of data produced